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Proceedings Paper

Mesoscale atmospherical model for a 3D optical turbulence characterization in astronomy
Author(s): Elena Masciadri
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Paper Abstract

The characterization of the optical turbulence (OT) should be considered as one of the most important challenges related to the ELTs feasibility. During the past few years it was proved that the limitations of the adaptive optics techniques due to the turbulence change as the AO techniques evolve. For this reason, it would be useful to develop a flexible tool that could characterize the turbulence in an exhaustive way and that permits, at the same time, relatively simple adaptations in order to satisfy new requirements of the AO techniques and the site testing. In this contribution I will talk about the usefulness of meso-scale atmospherical models for a 3D characterization of the optical turbulence. I will present the principal potentialities of the numerical technique in the astronomical context and the different methods that can be employed to simulate the OT. I will present the progress obtained in OT simulations using the 'Meso-Nh' model on some of the best observatories in the world: Cerro Paranal (Chile), Roque de Los Muchachos (Canary Islands) and San Pedro Martir (Mexico). I will show which is the score of success presently attained with the numerical technique and I will try to sketch how such simulations could be a useful support for AO techniques. Finally, I will talk about applications of the model to the selection of astronomical sites for the ELTs.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 February 2003
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 4839, Adaptive Optical System Technologies II, (7 February 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.457002
Show Author Affiliations
Elena Masciadri, Instituto de Astronomia/UNAM (Mexico)
Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Mexico)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4839:
Adaptive Optical System Technologies II
Peter L. Wizinowich; Domenico Bonaccini, Editor(s)

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