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Proceedings Paper

Environmental sentinel biomonitors: integrated response systems for monitoring toxic chemicals
Author(s): William H. van der Schalie; Roy Reuter; Tommy R. Shedd; Paul L. Knechtges
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Paper Abstract

Operational environments for military forces are becoming potentially more dangerous due to the increased number, use, and misuse of toxic chemicals across the entire range of military missions. Defense personnel may be exposed to harmful chemicals as a result of industrial accidents or intentional or unintentional action of enemy, friendly forces, or indigenous populations. While there has been a significant military effort to enable forces to operate safely and survive and sustain operations in nuclear, biological, chemical warfare agent environments, until recently there has not been a concomitant effort associated with potential adverse health effects from exposures of deployed personnel to toxic industrial chemicals. To provide continuous real-time toxicity assessments across a broad spectrum of individual chemicals or chemical mixtures, an Environmental Sentinel Biomonitor (ESB) system concept is proposed. An ESB system will integrate data from one or more platforms of biologically-based systems and chemical detectors placed in the environment to sense developing toxic conditions and transmit time-relevant data for use in risk assessment, mitigation, and/or management. Issues, challenges, and next steps for the ESB system concept are described, based in part on discussions at a September 2001 workshop sponsored by the U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2002
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4575, Chemical and Biological Early Warning Monitoring for Water, Food, and Ground, (21 February 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.456920
Show Author Affiliations
William H. van der Schalie, U.S. Army Ctr. for Environmental Health Research (United States)
Roy Reuter, Life Systems Inc. (United States)
Tommy R. Shedd, U.S. Army Ctr. for Environmental Health Research (United States)
Paul L. Knechtges, U.S. Army Ctr. for Environmental Health Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4575:
Chemical and Biological Early Warning Monitoring for Water, Food, and Ground
Janet L. Jensen; Larry W. Burggraf, Editor(s)

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