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Proceedings Paper

Nature's alternative to hyperspectral imaging and why nature is right
Author(s): H. John Caulfield
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Paper Abstract

Some animals have evolved the ability to use spectral information coming from the world to help them live their lives in some improved ways. Over many centuries, we humans have started to understand what color is, why it evolved and how animals gather the information they need to compute color. As a general rule, once we learn how and why nature does something, it makes sense to incorporate that knowledge into our technology. This paper explores Artificial Color. We adopt three aspects of Natural Color: The use of color as a discriminant in applications The special trick nature uses to sense data for color computation in which it uses two or more sensors with broad, spectrally overlapping bands to sense The selection of the spectral shape of those bands to enhance usefulness for a task. Artificial Color is compared with hyperspectral imaging, and the latter is found wanting in Sensitivity Speed Signal-to-noise ratio.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 December 2002
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 4787, Applications and Science of Neural Networks, Fuzzy Systems, and Evolutionary Computation V, (6 December 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.455869
Show Author Affiliations
H. John Caulfield, Fisk Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4787:
Applications and Science of Neural Networks, Fuzzy Systems, and Evolutionary Computation V
Bruno Bosacchi; David B. Fogel; James C. Bezdek, Editor(s)

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