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Proceedings Paper

Flight test results of the Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager
Author(s): Jeffrey A. Mendenhall; Donald E. Lencioni; David R. Hearn; Constantine J. Digenis
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Paper Abstract

The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is the primary instrument on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft (EO-1) and was developed under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). The NMP mission objective is to flight-validate advanced technologies that will enable dramatic improvements in performance, cost, mass, and schedule for future, Landsat-like, Earth Science Enterprise instruments. ALI contains a number of innovative features designed to achieve this objective. These include the basic instrument architecture, which employs a push-broom data collection mode, a wide field-of-view optical design, compact multi-spectral detector arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe for the short wave infrared bands, silicon carbide optics, and a multi-level solar calibration technique. The sensor includes detector arrays that operate in ten bands, one panchromatic, six VNIR and three SWIR, spanning the range from 0.433 to 2.35 μm. Launched on November 21, 2000, ALI instrument performance was monitored during its first year on orbit using data collected during solar, lunar, stellar, and earth observations. This paper will provide an overview of EO-1 mission activities during this period. Additionally, the on-orbit spatial and radiometric performance of the instrument will be compared to pre-flight measurements and the temporal stability of ALI will be presented.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 September 2002
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 4814, Earth Observing Systems VII, (24 September 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.453910
Show Author Affiliations
Jeffrey A. Mendenhall, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)
Donald E. Lencioni, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)
David R. Hearn, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)
Constantine J. Digenis, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4814:
Earth Observing Systems VII
William L. Barnes, Editor(s)

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