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Proceedings Paper

Decomposing rule of two-dimensional separable Talbot array illuminator
Author(s): Shuai Zhao; Changhe Zhou; Peng Xi; Liren Liu
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Paper Abstract

Talbot array illuminator (TAIL) based on fractional Talbot effect is useful for illuminating very large array, the number of phase levels of TAIL is a very important factor for estimation of practical fabrication complexity and cost. Based on the symmetry of the phase distribution, we can obtain the maximum phase level number for a given fractional Talbot distance. But because of the redundant equal phase, the exact phase level number is still unpredictable for an arbitrary opening ratio (1/M) of the illumination array. In this paper, we'll show that there is a simple decomposing rule to predict the number of phase levels of two-dimensional Talbot array illuminator (2D-TAIL) with the opening ratios (1/Mx), (1/My) in two dimensions, respectively. In the condition that the output array is alternatively (pi) -phase-modulated, there are similar simple relations. These results are generally applicable and should be interesting for practical use. Based on the joint-Talbot effect, we realized a separable 2D-TAIL by using two crossly placed 1D-TAIL. The 1D-TAIL is fabricated with the usual binary-optics technique and the number of phase levels in this experiment can be well explained by our theoretical results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 December 2001
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 4438, Physics, Theory, and Applications of Periodic Structures in Optics, (26 December 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.451493
Show Author Affiliations
Shuai Zhao, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China)
Changhe Zhou, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China)
Peng Xi, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China)
Liren Liu, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4438:
Physics, Theory, and Applications of Periodic Structures in Optics
Philippe Lalanne, Editor(s)

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