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Proceedings Paper

Numerical simulation of linear and nonlinear quantum optics as a design tool for free-space quantum communications and quantum imaging
Author(s): Ronald E. Meyers; Keith S. Deacon; D. Rosen
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Paper Abstract

A new quantum optics tool for simulating quantum probability density functions resulting from the linear and nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and with other photons is developed and presented. It can be used to design and simulate quantum optics experiments used in quantum communications, quantum computing, and quantum imaging. Examples of a photon interacting with linears systems of mirrors and beamsplitters are simulated. Nonlinear simulations of the interaction of three photons resulting in photon momentum entanglement is presented. The wavefunction is expanded in Fock states. Fock states cannot be represented by classical modeling and therefore, the results of our modeling can in general represent phenomena in both the linear and nonlinear cases which cannot be modeled by classical linear optics. The modeling presented here is more general than the classical linear optics. Models of atmospheric turbulence and their simulations are presented and demonstrate the potential for first principles physics quantum optics simulations through turbulence in realistic environments.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 December 2002
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 4821, Free-Space Laser Communication and Laser Imaging II, (9 December 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.451058
Show Author Affiliations
Ronald E. Meyers, Army Research Lab. (United States)
Keith S. Deacon, Army Research Lab. (United States)
D. Rosen, Army Research Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4821:
Free-Space Laser Communication and Laser Imaging II
Jennifer C. Ricklin; David G. Voelz, Editor(s)

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