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Proceedings Paper

Flight photomulitplier tube performance for the Earth Observing System's SOLSTICE II instruments
Author(s): Virginia Ann Drake; William E. McClintock; Thomas N. Woods; Gary J. Rottman
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Paper Abstract

The challenging performances requirement placed on the Earth Observing System (EOS) SOLar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment II, part of the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), is to measure the solar irradiance from 115 nm - 320 nm to within 5% of its absolute value, with a 0.5% per year relative accuracy for a mission life of 5 years. The integrated flight Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) detector package developed for these instruments contains a PMT, PMT housing, high voltage divider, pulse amplifier discriminator (PAD) and high voltage power supply. This paper summarizes the results of laboratory measurements that were made on the performance characteristics of the detectors systems selected for flight. These measurements include pulse height distribution, quantum efficiency, photocathode uniformity, photocathode temperature response for both Cesium Iodide and Cesium Telluride, as well as, PAD dead-time and light hysteresis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 February 2003
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4796, Low-Light-Level and Real-Time Imaging Systems, Components, and Applications, (5 February 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.450879
Show Author Affiliations
Virginia Ann Drake, Univ. of Colorado/Boulder (United States)
William E. McClintock, Univ. of Colorado/Boulder (United States)
Thomas N. Woods, Univ. of Colorado/Boulder (United States)
Gary J. Rottman, Univ. of Colorado/Boulder (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4796:
Low-Light-Level and Real-Time Imaging Systems, Components, and Applications
C. Bruce Johnson; Divyendu Sinha; Phillip A. Laplante, Editor(s)

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