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Proceedings Paper

Slope stability radar for monitoring mine walls
Author(s): Bryan Reeves; David A. Noon; Glen F. Stickley; Dennis Longstaff
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Paper Abstract

Determining slope stability in a mining operation is an important task. This is especially true when the mine workings are close to a potentially unstable slope. A common technique to determine slope stability is to monitor the small precursory movements, which occur prior to collapse. The slope stability radar has been developed to remotely scan a rock slope to continuously monitor the spatial deformation of the face. Using differential radar interferometry, the system can detect deformation movements of a rough wall with sub-millimeter accuracy, and with high spatial and temporal resolution. The effects of atmospheric variations and spurious signals can be reduced via signal processing means. The advantage of radar over other monitoring techniques is that it provides full area coverage without the need for mounted reflectors or equipment on the wall. In addition, the radar waves adequately penetrate through rain, dust and smoke to give reliable measurements, twenty-four hours a day. The system has been trialed at three open-cut coal mines in Australia, which demonstrated the potential for real-time monitoring of slope stability during active mining operations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 November 2001
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 4491, Subsurface and Surface Sensing Technologies and Applications III, (27 November 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.450188
Show Author Affiliations
Bryan Reeves, Univ. of Queensland (Australia)
David A. Noon, Univ. of Queensland (Australia)
Glen F. Stickley, Univ. of Queensland (Australia)
Dennis Longstaff, Univ. of Queensland (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4491:
Subsurface and Surface Sensing Technologies and Applications III
Cam Nguyen, Editor(s)

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