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Proceedings Paper

Histochemical identification of malignant and premalignant lesions
Author(s): Charles Liebow; M. J. Maloney
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Paper Abstract

Malignant and transforming cells can be identified by biochemical parameters which can be used to localize lesions in situ for laser surgery. These cells express unique proteins, proteins in unusual quantities, or other biochemical alterations which can be utilized to image lesions of such cells. Several methods have been identified, both in vitro and in vivo, to identify such lesions. Several antibodies were examined for their properties of tissue identification, including CEA, F36/22, and AE1/AE3. F36/22, an antibody developed by M. T. Chu against human breast cancer cells, associated with two lines of oral cancer (KB and HCPC), and against two naturally occurring human oral squamous cell cancers. CEA, an antibody developed against human colon cancer, also reacted against both cell lines and both pathological samples. AE1/AE3, developed against normal fibrous components, also reacted against the samples, but in a much less regular manner. F36/22 associated with the histologically identifiably most dedifferentiated cells at the leading edge of the invading cancer. CEA, on the other hand, associated with more quiescent, older, established cancer cells. This demonstrates that antibodies developed against cancers of different organs can be used to identify a wide variety of cancers, and may have prognostic value. F36/22 coupled to fluorescein was used to identify oral cancer cells. Other properties of cancers and developing cancers can also be exploited to identify cancers, including their over-expression of tyrosine kinase and tyrosine kinase stimulating hormones such as Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF). A model of premalignant lesion produced in the hamster buccal cheek pouch with 6 week application of DMBA over-expresses constitutive tyrosine kinase which can be demonstrated biochemically. This initiated lesion can be promoted to frank cancer by growth factors released in response to laser surgery. Preliminary results suggest that these lesions can be identified by Photofrin II uptake. This work suggests that biochemical properties of cancers can be used to identify premalignant cells.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 June 1991
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 1426, Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Early Diagnosis: Mechanisms and Techniques, (1 June 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.44045
Show Author Affiliations
Charles Liebow, SUNY/Buffalo School of Dental Medicine (United States)
M. J. Maloney, SUNY/Buffalo School of Dental Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1426:
Optical Methods for Tumor Treatment and Early Diagnosis: Mechanisms and Techniques
Thomas J. Dougherty, Editor(s)

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