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Proceedings Paper

Further pursuit of correlation between lens aberration content and imaging performance
Author(s): Steve D. Slonaker
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Paper Abstract

As further experience is gained and data is gathered using direct Phase Measurement Interferometry (PMI) techniques in the production of leading edge lithography lenses, some progress is being made towards the goal of assigning specific image degradation symptoms to specific types of aberration content. However, since both the specific object being imaged and the illumination distribution being applied to the projection will define the spatial frequency content of a given image, any attempt at analyzing aberration sensitivity must also address these constraints. The paper summarizes the results of image simulation studies, wherein the through-focus aerial image intensity distribution is initially described by a set of metrics and coefficients. These íºimaging metricsí¿ (for example, curvature or tilt of CD vs. Focus functional representation) are then directly correlated to various types of aberration content, as represented through Zernike coefficients. Some types of imaging responses are seen to correlate to specific aberrations, while others do not. A method for specifying and identifying threshold levels of 'influencing aberration' are determined from the sensitivity studies executed. In particular, the imaging of alternating phase shift mask patterns in the region of half-(lambda) will be investigated.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 September 2001
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 4346, Optical Microlithography XIV, (14 September 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.435678
Show Author Affiliations
Steve D. Slonaker, Nikon Precision Inc. (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4346:
Optical Microlithography XIV
Christopher J. Progler, Editor(s)

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