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Proceedings Paper

Radio frequency pulse compression experiments at SLAC
Author(s): Zoltan D. Farkas; T. L. Lavine; A. Menegat; Roger H. Miller; C. Nantista; G. Spalek; Peggy Blake Wilson
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Paper Abstract

Proposed future positron-electron linear colliders1 would be capable of investigating fundamental processes of interest in the 0.5—5 TeV beam-energy range. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) gradient of about 20 MV/m this would imply prohibitive lengths of about 50—250 kilometers per linac. We can reduce the length by increasing the gradient but this implies high peak power, on the order of 400- to 1000-MW at X-Band. One possible way to generate high peak power is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before DC to RF conversion, as is done using magnetic switching for induction linacs, or after DC to RF conversion, as is done for the SLC. Using RF pulse compression it is possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output that has already been obtained from high-power X-Band klystrons to the levels required by the linear colliders. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. The advantages of RFPC are: 1. Generally the higher the power the harder it is to increase it further. This is not the case with RFPC because the control elements operates at low power. 2. With RFPC we can alternate between low power un-compressed pulses and high power compressed pulses by turning the modulation off and on. It is much more difficult to design tubes that function both at low and high peak power levels. 3. RFPC may have lower capital, maintenance and replacement costs per watt of peak power. 4. For a given compression ratio, the cost of RFPC is independent of pulse energy or peak power. Three methods of RF pulse compression that are in use or have been proposed at SLAC will be reported on. The SLAC Energy Development (SLED),2 where RF energy is stored in cavities; the Resonant Line SLED (RELS),3 where the energy is stored in long resonant lines; and the Binary Pulse Compressor (BPC) ,where the energy is stored in traveling wave delay lines.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 1991
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 1407, Intense Microwave and Particle Beams II, (1 April 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.43526
Show Author Affiliations
Zoltan D. Farkas, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)
T. L. Lavine, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)
A. Menegat, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)
Roger H. Miller, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)
C. Nantista, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)
G. Spalek, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)
Peggy Blake Wilson, Stanford Linear Accelerator Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1407:
Intense Microwave and Particle Beams II
Howard E. Brandt, Editor(s)

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