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Proceedings Paper

Electron trapping and acceleration in a modified elongated betatron
Author(s): Yuanxu Y. Song; Amnon Fisher; Robert M. Prohaska; Norman Rostoker
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Paper Abstract

1407_48Electron trapping and acceleration have been successfully accomplished in the modified elongated betatron at UC Irvine. About 150 nC of electrons have been trapped and accelerated for $OM900 microsecond(s) until the betatron field reached its maximum, establishing an electron layer with $OM80 (Alpha) of circulating current and $OM1.6 MeV of energy in the cylindrical chamber. No minimum current is required to start the beam trapping in the betatron. There are essentially no electron losses during the acceleration at low injection currents; the electron losses at high injection currents are probably caused by the space charge effects, resistive chamber walls, and betatron field ripple. By filling the chamber with plasma, an electron beam of $OM120 (Alpha) current ($OM230 nC of charge) and $OM1.6 MeV energy has been observed. No instabilities have been found during the acceleration except the precessional instability which has been effectively controlled by the toroidal magnetic field. An electron orbit simulation has been carried out; it has shown that practically no resonance instabilities can be developed in the stretched betatron due to its unique geometry and field configuration, which has been confirmed by the experiment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 1991
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 1407, Intense Microwave and Particle Beams II, (1 April 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.43518
Show Author Affiliations
Yuanxu Y. Song, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)
Amnon Fisher, Univ. of California/Irvine (Israel)
Robert M. Prohaska, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)
Norman Rostoker, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1407:
Intense Microwave and Particle Beams II
Howard E. Brandt, Editor(s)

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