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Proceedings Paper

High-speed imaging/ratio temperature radiometer
Author(s): Nobuie Konishi; Kenji Mitsui; Yasufumi Emori
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Paper Abstract

For analyzing combustion and melting phenomena, it is necessary not only to measure the deformation and its acceleration of the applied object which is being deformed at a high speed and under high temperature, but to detect the temperature of the object and to know the temperature distribution over the object. By the recent development in electronics, including new solid-state image sensors such as area CCD and C-MOS sensors, and the progress of image processing techniques, new imaging radiometers have been developed which two-dimensionally acquire objects in motion at a high speed and under high temperature, and present the temperature distribution over the object immediately. The popular pseudo-color thermal imager only indicates the relative differences of radiance from the measured object by assigning different colors, but does not show the correct temperature, because their calculated temperature is radiance temperature whose radiation is measured at a single wavelength. In this paper, we present the concept of ratio temperature measurement which measures radiance from the object at two wavelengths and presents 'truer' true temperature than radiance temperature. We have developed a new high speed imaging/ratio temperature radiometer by using the Photocam-RGB high-speed video camera readily available on the market. Here we present the outline of our experiments.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 April 2001
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4183, 24th International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, (17 April 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.424293
Show Author Affiliations
Nobuie Konishi, Nobby Tech, Ltd. (Japan)
Kenji Mitsui, Photron Ltd. (Japan)
Yasufumi Emori, Chiba Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4183:
24th International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics
Kazuyoshi Takayama; Tsutomo Saito; Harald Kleine; Eugene V. Timofeev, Editor(s)

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