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Proceedings Paper

Second-harmonic magnetoresistive imaging to authenticate and recover data from magnetic storage media
Author(s): David P. Pappas; C. Stephen Arnold; Gideon Shalev; Carla Eunice; D. Stevenson; Stephen D. Voran; Michael E. Read; E. M. Gormley; Jim Cash; Ken Marr; James J. Ryan
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Paper Abstract

A scanning magneto-resistance microscope was developed that allows for high resolution imaging of magnetic tapes and digital media. By using second harmonic detection to remove thermal anomalies we are able to image sufficient lengths of tape for authentication purposes and for data recovery from damaged samples. This allows for high contrast images and direct conversion of the scanned information into originally recorded analog audio waveforms or digital data.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2001
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4232, Enabling Technologies for Law Enforcement and Security, (21 February 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.417553
Show Author Affiliations
David P. Pappas, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
C. Stephen Arnold, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Gideon Shalev, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Carla Eunice, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
D. Stevenson, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
Stephen D. Voran, Institute for Telecommunication Sciences (United States)
Michael E. Read, Physical Sciences, Inc. (United States)
E. M. Gormley, National Transportation Safety Board (United States)
Jim Cash, National Transportation Safety Board (United States)
Ken Marr, Federal Bureau of Investigation (United States)
James J. Ryan, Federal Bureau of Investigation (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4232:
Enabling Technologies for Law Enforcement and Security
Simon K. Bramble; Lenny I. Rudin; Simon K. Bramble; Edward M. Carapezza; Lenny I. Rudin, Editor(s)

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