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Proceedings Paper

Sensitive wetlands delineation using multitemporal satellite imagery: a comparative study in the intermountain western U.S.
Author(s): Bruce Cheney; Mark W. Jackson; Perry J. Hardin
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Paper Abstract

This paper details an effort to develop an operational methodology to distinguish lacustrine, palustrine and riverine wetlands from irrigated agriculture in a continental area using archived multi-temporal/multi-spectral Landsat TM data.. Archival Landsat TM data were acquired over the Little Wood River Valley of Idaho in April, August and September of 1985. All dates of imagery were subjected to a Kauth-Thomas transformation and then stacked into a single 9-band image and submitted to a supervised classification. DEM data was used to remove spectral confusion with mountain vegetative systems with similar temporal signatures to the wetlands of interest. Field checks and comparison to National Wetland Inventory (NWI) maps completed in 1984 revealed a 98.3% agreement in classification of non-wetland areas. 54% of the areas classified as wetland on the NWI were classified as wetland using our method. This is attributed to practice of generalization of the NWI maps in which several small wetlands are circumscribed into a single large area. The digital method correctly identified the wetland patches and classified the interstices as dry land. Confusion with irrigated agriculture was almost completely absent.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 January 2001
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 4171, Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology II, (23 January 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.413944
Show Author Affiliations
Bruce Cheney, JUB Engineering (United States)
Mark W. Jackson, Brigham Young Univ. (United States)
Perry J. Hardin, Brigham Young Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4171:
Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology II
Manfred Owe; Guido D'Urso; Eugenio Zilioli, Editor(s)

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