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Proceedings Paper

Validation and analysis of Earth Radiation Budget active-cavity radiometric data (1985-1999)
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Paper Abstract

On 5 October 1984, the US' first woman in space, Dr. Sally Ride, inserted the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) into a 57 degree inclined orbit using the shuttles remote manipulator arm. The orbital precession period of the satellite was 72 days. The nonscanner instrument aboard the ERBS has acquired earth-emitted and reflected radiant flux data since that time, having exceeded its designed lifetime of three years by a factor of five. During these 15 years, the ERBS nonscanner has become a de-facto standard to which much remotely sensed radiative flux data is compared. This paper compares the fifteen year history of the ERBS wide and medium field-of-view non-scanner detectors with the solar irradiance data acquired by the co-located ERBS solar monitor and with the National Climatic Data Center's earth- surface temperature dataset for the same period.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 January 2001
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 4168, Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere V, (31 January 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.413852
Show Author Affiliations
Jack Paden, Science Applications International Corp. (United States)
G. Louis Smith, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ. (United States)
Robert Benjamin Lee, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
Kory J. Priestley, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
Dhirendra K. Pandey, Science Applications International Corp. (United States)
Robert S. Wilson, Science Applications International Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4168:
Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere V
Jaqueline E. Russell; Klaus Schaefer; Olga Lado-Bordowsky, Editor(s)

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