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Proceedings Paper

Sensitivity of polysilicon and polycide antenna MOS capacitor to ion implantation charging effects
Author(s): Tomasz Brozek; Cory Norton
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Paper Abstract

Wafer-charging monitors based on MOS capacitor antennas are a popular tool to assess the ion-implantation induced charging in IC manufacturing. We have found that silicidation of polysilicon antennas prior to ion implantation exposure simplifies the test tasks and shortens the cycle time for tool monitoring. The paper presents comparison of ion-implantation charging obtained on polysilicon as well as polycide gate capacitors. For polysilicon antennas a rapid thermal treatment was applied to reinstate polysilicon conductivity and enable electrical testing. The silicided gate electrode offers better protection of the thin oxide against direct ion bombardment and displacement damage in the oxide. The data shows that silicided capacitors suffer less charging under the same implantation process. This makes polycide MOS sensors less sensitive and requires additional calibration with respect to real charging levels occurring during implantation of bare polysilicon gates. The effect is further studied with respect to real charging levels occurring during implantation of bare polysilicon gates. The effect is further studied with respect to charge generation through the emission of secondary electrons from the surface of polysilicon and polycide under ion beam bombardment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 August 2000
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 4182, Process Control and Diagnostics, (23 August 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.410104
Show Author Affiliations
Tomasz Brozek, Motorola (United States)
Cory Norton, Motorola (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4182:
Process Control and Diagnostics
Michael L. Miller; Kaihan A. Ashtiani, Editor(s)

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