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Proceedings Paper

Fiber optic immunosensor for cross-linked fibrin concentration
Author(s): Samuel E. Moskowitz
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Paper Abstract

Working with calcium ions in the blood, platelets produce thromboplastin which transforms prothrombin into thrombin. Removing peptides, thrombin changes fibrinogen into fibrin. Cross-linked insoluble fibrin polymers are solubilized by enzyme plasmin found in blood plasma. Resulting D-dimers are elevated in patients with intravascular coagulation, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, multiple trauma, cancer, impaired renal and liver functions, and sepsis. Consisting principally of a NIR 780 nm GaAlAs laser diode and a 800 nm avalanche photodiode (APD), the fiber-optic immunosensor can determined D-dimer concentration to levels <0.1 ng/ml. A capture monoclonal antibody to the antigen soluble cross-linked fibrin is employed. Immobilized at the tip of an optical fiber by avidin-biotin, the captured antigen is detected by a second antibody which is labeled with NN 382 fluorescent dye. An evanescent wave traveling on an excitation optical fiber excites the antibody-antigen fluorophore complex. Concentration of cross-linked fibrin is directly proportional to the APD measured intensity of fluorescence. NIR fluorescence has advantages of low background interference, short fluorescence lifetime, and large difference between excitation and emission peaks. Competitive ELISA test for D-dimer concentration requires trained personnel performing a time consuming operation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 August 2000
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 4074, Applications of Optical Fiber Sensors, (31 August 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.397871
Show Author Affiliations
Samuel E. Moskowitz, Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4074:
Applications of Optical Fiber Sensors
Alan J. Rogers, Editor(s)

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