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Proceedings Paper

Results from field tests of a passive microwave radiometer mine detector
Author(s): Giovanni De Amici; Alejandro Valles; Larry Yujiri; Jack Huynh; Kelly D. Sherbondy
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Paper Abstract

Objects hidden under a lossy medium, like soil, can be detected when the boundary between the object and the medium acts as a reflector for incoming microwave radiation. Under typical soil conditions, the maximum depth at which the object can be detected is a few wavelengths. It is therefore advantageous to employ low-frequency receivers. Under a contract from the US Army CECOM-NVESD, TRW has designed and built the Microwave Radiometer Mine Detector; a hand-held man-portable unit, which employs a cold radiometric sky as the illuminating source. The breadboard unit works at 5 Ghz using a direct RF-gain, total-power radiometer. The unit was field-tested at the Army facility at Fort AP Hill during August of 1999. The test yielded a probability of detection of 45 percent and a false alarm rate of 0.11/m2.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 August 2000
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 4038, Detection and Remediation Technologies for Mines and Minelike Targets V, (22 August 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.396253
Show Author Affiliations
Giovanni De Amici, TRW Space & Technology Division (United States)
Alejandro Valles, TRW Space & Technology Division (United States)
Larry Yujiri, TRW Space & Technology Division (United States)
Jack Huynh, U.S. Army Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (United States)
Kelly D. Sherbondy, U.S. Army Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4038:
Detection and Remediation Technologies for Mines and Minelike Targets V
Abinash C. Dubey; James F. Harvey; J. Thomas Broach; Regina E. Dugan, Editor(s)

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