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Proceedings Paper

Digital signal processing using virtual instruments
Author(s): James A. Anderson; Raghu Korrapati; Nikunja K. Swain
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Paper Abstract

The area of test and measurement is changing rapidly because of the recent developments in software and hardware. The test and measurement systems are increasingly becoming PC based. Most of these PC based systems use graphical programming language to design test and measurement modules called virtual instruments (Vis). These Vis provide visual representation of dat or models, and make understanding of abstract concepts and algorithms easier. This allows users to express their ideas in a concise manner. One such virtual instruments package is LabVIEW from National Instruments Corporation at Austin, Texas. This software package is one of the first graphical programming products and is currently used in number of academic institutions, industries, Department of Defense graphical programming products and is currently sued in number of academic institutions, industries, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration for various test, measurement, and control applications. LabVIEW has an extensive built-in VI library that can be used to design and develop solutions for different applications. Besides using the built-in VI library that can be used to design and develop solutions for different applications. Besides using the built-in VI modules in LabVIEW, the user can design new VI modules easily. This paper discusses the use of LabVIEW to design and develop digital signal processing VI modules such as Fourier Analysis and Windowing. Instructors can use these modules to teach some of the signal processing concepts effectively.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 August 2000
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 4052, Signal Processing, Sensor Fusion, and Target Recognition IX, (4 August 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.395078
Show Author Affiliations
James A. Anderson, South Carolina State Univ. (United States)
Raghu Korrapati, Webster Univ. (United States)
Nikunja K. Swain, South Carolina State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4052:
Signal Processing, Sensor Fusion, and Target Recognition IX
Ivan Kadar, Editor(s)

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