Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Adaptive early detection ML/PDA estimator for LO targets with EO sensors
Author(s): Muhammad R. Chummun; Thiagalingam Kirubarajan; Yaakov Bar-Shalom
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The batch Maximum Likelihood Estimator, combined with Probabilistic Data (ML-PDA), has been shown to be effective in acquiring low observable (LO) - low SNR - non-maneuvering targets in the presence of heavy clutter. The use of signal strength or amplitude information (AI) in the ML-PDA estimator with AI in a sliding-window fashion, to detect high- speed targets in heavy clutter using electro-optical (EO) sensors. The initial time and the length of the sliding-window are adjusted adaptively according to the information content of the received measurements. A track validation scheme via hypothesis testing is developed to confirm the estimated track, that is, the presence of a target, in each window. The sliding-window ML-PDA approach, together with track validation, enables early detection by rejecting noninformative scans, target reacquisition in case of temporary target disappearance and the handling of targets with speeds evolving over time. The proposed algorithm is shown to detect the target, which is hidden in as many as 600 false alarms per scan, 10 frames earlier than the Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (MHT) algorithm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 July 2000
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 4048, Signal and Data Processing of Small Targets 2000, (13 July 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.391991
Show Author Affiliations
Muhammad R. Chummun, Univ. of Connecticut (United States)
Thiagalingam Kirubarajan, Univ. of Connecticut (United States)
Yaakov Bar-Shalom, Univ. of Connecticut (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4048:
Signal and Data Processing of Small Targets 2000
Oliver E. Drummond, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top