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Proceedings Paper

Description and performance of the low-energy transmission grating spectrometer on board Chandra
Author(s): A. C. Brinkman; Theo Gunsing; Jelle S. Kaastra; Rob van der Meer; Rolf Mewe; Frits B. S. Paerels; Ton Raassen; Jan van Rooijen; Heinrich W. Braeuninger; Vadim Burwitz; Gisela D. Hartner; Guenther Kettenring; Peter Predehl; Jeremy J. Drake; C. Olivia Johnson; Almus T. Kenter; Ralph Porter Kraft; Stephen S. Murray; Peter W. Ratzlaff; Bradford J. Wargelin
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Paper Abstract

The Chandra spacecraft has been launched successfully on July 23, 1999. The payload consists of a high resolution X- ray telescope, two imaging detector systems in the focal plane and two transmission gratings. Each one of the two gratings can be put in the beam behind the telescope and the grating spectrometers are optimized for high and low energy, respectively. The Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer consists of three parts: the high-resolution telescope, the transmission grating array and the detector, to read-out the spectral image.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 July 2000
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 4012, X-Ray Optics, Instruments, and Missions III, (18 July 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.391599
Show Author Affiliations
A. C. Brinkman, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
Theo Gunsing, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
Jelle S. Kaastra, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
Rob van der Meer, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
Rolf Mewe, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
Frits B. S. Paerels, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (United States)
Ton Raassen, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands and Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek (Netherlands)
Jan van Rooijen, Space Research Organisation of the Netherlands (Netherlands)
Heinrich W. Braeuninger, Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Gisela D. Hartner, Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Guenther Kettenring, Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Peter Predehl, Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Jeremy J. Drake, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
C. Olivia Johnson, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Almus T. Kenter, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Ralph Porter Kraft, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Stephen S. Murray, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Peter W. Ratzlaff, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Bradford J. Wargelin, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4012:
X-Ray Optics, Instruments, and Missions III
Joachim E. Truemper; Bernd Aschenbach, Editor(s)

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