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Proceedings Paper

Absolute effective area of the Chandra high-resolution mirror assembly (HRMA)
Author(s): Daniel A. Schwartz; Laurence P. David; R. Hank Donnelly; Richard J. Edgar; Terrance J. Gaetz; Dale E. Graessle; Diab Jerius; Michael Juda; Edwin M. Kellogg; Brian R. McNamara; Paul P. Plucinsky; Leon P. Van Speybroeck; Bradford J. Wargelin; S. Wolk; Ping Zhao; Daniel Dewey; Herman L. Marshall; Norbert S. Schulz; Ronald F. Elsner; Jeffery J. Kolodziejczak; Stephen L. O'Dell; Douglas A. Swartz; Allyn F. Tennant; Martin C. Weisskopf
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Paper Abstract

The Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched in July 1999, and is returning exquisite sub-arc second X-ray images of star groups, supernova remnants, galaxies, quasars, and clusters of galaxies. In addition to being the premier X-ray observatory in terms of angular and spectral resolution, Chandra is the best calibrated X-ray facility ever flown. We discuss here the calibration of the on-axis effective area of the High Resolution Mirror Assembly. Because we do not know the absolute X-ray flux density of any celestial source, this must be based primarily on ground measurements and on modeling. We use celestial sources which may be assumed to have smoothly varying spectra, such as the BL Lac object Markarian 421, to verify the continuity of the area calibration as a function of energy across the Ir M-edges. We believe the accuracy of the HRMA area calibration is of order 2%.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 July 2000
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 4012, X-Ray Optics, Instruments, and Missions III, (18 July 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.391566
Show Author Affiliations
Daniel A. Schwartz, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Laurence P. David, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
R. Hank Donnelly, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Richard J. Edgar, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Terrance J. Gaetz, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Dale E. Graessle, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Diab Jerius, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Michael Juda, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Edwin M. Kellogg, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Brian R. McNamara, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Paul P. Plucinsky, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Leon P. Van Speybroeck, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Bradford J. Wargelin, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
S. Wolk, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Ping Zhao, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Daniel Dewey, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Herman L. Marshall, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Norbert S. Schulz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Ronald F. Elsner, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Jeffery J. Kolodziejczak, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Stephen L. O'Dell, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Douglas A. Swartz, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Allyn F. Tennant, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Martin C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4012:
X-Ray Optics, Instruments, and Missions III
Joachim E. Truemper; Bernd Aschenbach, Editor(s)

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