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Proceedings Paper

Microhydraulic transducer technology for actuation and power generation
Author(s): Nesbitt W. Hagood; David C. Roberts; Laxminarayana Saggere; Kenneth S. Breuer; Kuo-Shen Chen; Jorge A. Carretero; Hanqing Li; Richard Mlcak; Seward W. Pulitzer; Martin A. Schmidt; S. Mark Spearing; Yu-Hsuan Su
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Paper Abstract

The paper introduces a novel transducer technology, called the solid-state micro-hydraulic transducer, currently under development at MIT. The new technology is enabled through integration of micromachining technology, piezoelectrics, and microhydraulic concepts. These micro-hydraulic transducers are capable of bi-directional electromechanical energy conversion, i.e., they can operate as both an actuator that supplies high mechanical force in response to electrical input and an energy generator that transduces electrical energy from mechanical energy in the environment. These transducers are capable of transducing energy at very high specific power output in the order of 1 kW/kg, and thus, they have the potential to enable many novel applications. The concept, the design, and the potential applications of the transducers are presented. Present efforts towards the development of these transducers, and the challenges involved therein, are also discussed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 June 2000
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 3985, Smart Structures and Materials 2000: Smart Structures and Integrated Systems, (22 June 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.388877
Show Author Affiliations
Nesbitt W. Hagood, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
David C. Roberts, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Laxminarayana Saggere, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Kenneth S. Breuer, Brown Univ. (United States)
Kuo-Shen Chen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Jorge A. Carretero, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Hanqing Li, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Richard Mlcak, Boston Microsystems, Inc. (United States)
Seward W. Pulitzer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Martin A. Schmidt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
S. Mark Spearing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Yu-Hsuan Su, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3985:
Smart Structures and Materials 2000: Smart Structures and Integrated Systems
Norman M. Wereley, Editor(s)

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