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Proceedings Paper

Real-time detection of impact load on composite laminates with embedded small-diameter optical fiber
Author(s): Hiroaki Tsutsui; Tomio Sanda; Yoji Okabe; Nobuo Takeda
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Paper Abstract

It is well known that the compression after impact (CAI) strength of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates decreases by impact damage, especially delamination. The impact damage has a close relation to impact energy, which can be derived from the time history of impact load. Thus, it is important to detect the impact load applied to the composites. In this study, single-mode or multi-mode small-diameter optical fibers embedded in CFRP laminates were used as a sensor for detecting the impact load. Diameters of the cladding and the polyimide coating are 40 μm and 52 μm, respectively. Such optical fibers embedded inside laminas cause no serious effect on the mechanical properties of composites. The optical fiber sensors were able to detect the impact by bending loss in the vicinity of impact point. The optical fibers were embedded parallel to reinforcing fibers in CFRP composites. Charpy impact tests were performed for the CFRP specimens. The strain on the surface of the specimens, the optical loss and the impact load were measured as a function of time. Then, the relationship between the optical loss and the impact load was discussed experimentally and theoretically.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 June 2000
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 3986, Smart Structures and Materials 2000: Sensory Phenomena and Measurement Instrumentation for Smart Structures and Materials, (12 June 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.388098
Show Author Affiliations
Hiroaki Tsutsui, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (Japan)
Tomio Sanda, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (Japan)
Yoji Okabe, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Nobuo Takeda, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3986:
Smart Structures and Materials 2000: Sensory Phenomena and Measurement Instrumentation for Smart Structures and Materials
Richard O. Claus; William B. Spillman, Editor(s)

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