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Proceedings Paper

Optoacoustic cell permeation
Author(s): Steven R. Visuri; Nicholas J. Heredia
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Paper Abstract

Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode- pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating a kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to culture and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally-impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 June 2000
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 3914, Laser-Tissue Interaction XI: Photochemical, Photothermal, and Photomechanical, (13 June 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.388044
Show Author Affiliations
Steven R. Visuri, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Nicholas J. Heredia, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3914:
Laser-Tissue Interaction XI: Photochemical, Photothermal, and Photomechanical
Jeffrey O. Hollinger; Donald Dean Duncan; Jeffrey O. Hollinger; Donald Dean Duncan; Steven L. Jacques, Editor(s)

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