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Proceedings Paper

Biomechanically based simulation of brain deformations for intraoperative image correction: coupling of elastic and fluid models
Author(s): Alexander Hagemann; Karl Rohr; H. Siegfried Stiehl
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Paper Abstract

In order to improve the accuracy of image-guided neurosurgery, different biomechanical models have been developed to correct preoperative images w.r.t. intraoperative changes like brain shift or tumor resection. All existing biomechanical models simulate different anatomical structures by using either appropriate boundary conditions or by spatially varying material parameter values, while assuming the same physical model for all anatomical structures. In general, this leads to physically implausible results, especially in the case of adjacent elastic and fluid structures. Therefore, we propose a new approach which allows to couple different physical models. In our case, we simulate rigid, elastic, and fluid regions by using the appropriate physical description for each material, namely either the Navier equation or the Stokes equation. To solve the resulting differential equations, we derive a linear matrix system for each region by applying the finite element method (FEM). Thereafter, the linear matrix systems are linked together, ending up with one overall linear matrix system. Our approach has been tested using synthetic as well as tomographic images. It turns out from experiments, that the integrated treatment of rigid, elastic, and fluid regions significantly improves the prediction results in comparison to a pure linear elastic model.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 June 2000
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 3979, Medical Imaging 2000: Image Processing, (6 June 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.387727
Show Author Affiliations
Alexander Hagemann, Univ. Hamburg (United States)
Karl Rohr, Univ. Hamburg (Germany)
H. Siegfried Stiehl, Univ. Hamburg (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3979:
Medical Imaging 2000: Image Processing
Kenneth M. Hanson, Editor(s)

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