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Proceedings Paper

Post-PRK corneal scatter measurements with a scanning confocal slit photon counter
Author(s): John Taboada; David Gaines; Mary Alice Perez; Steve G. Waller; Douglas J. Ivan; J. Bruce Baldwin; Frank LoRusso; Ronald C. Tutt; Jose Perez; Thomas Tredici; Dan A. Johnson
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Paper Abstract

Increased corneal light scatter or 'haze' has been associated with excimer laser photorefractive surgery of the cornea. The increased scatter can affect visual performance; however, topical steroid treatment post surgery substantially reduces the post PRK scatter. For the treatment and monitoring of the scattering characteristics of the cornea, various methods have been developed to objectively measure the magnitude of the scatter. These methods generally can measure scatter associated with clinically observable levels of haze. For patients with moderate to low PRK corrections receiving steroid treatment, measurement becomes fairly difficult as the haze clinical rating is non observable. The goal of this development was to realize an objective, non-invasive physical measurement that could produce a significant reading for any level including the background present in a normal cornea. As back-scatter is the only readily accessible observable, the instrument is based on this measurement. To achieve this end required the use of a confocal method to bias out the background light that would normally confound conventional methods. A number of subjects with nominal refractive errors in an Air Force study have undergone PRK surgery. A measurable increase in corneal scatter has been observed in these subjects whereas clinical ratings of the haze were noted as level zero. Other favorable aspects of this back-scatter based instrument include an optical capability to perform what is equivalent to an optical A-scan of the anterior chamber. Lens scatter can also be measured.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 June 2000
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 3908, Ophthalmic Technologies X, (7 June 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.387510
Show Author Affiliations
John Taboada, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
David Gaines, Taboada Research Instruments Inc. (United States)
Mary Alice Perez, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
Steve G. Waller, U.S. Air Force Medical Ctr. (United States)
Douglas J. Ivan, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
J. Bruce Baldwin, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
Frank LoRusso, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
Ronald C. Tutt, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
Jose Perez, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
Thomas Tredici, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine/FECO (United States)
Dan A. Johnson, U.S. Air Force Medical Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3908:
Ophthalmic Technologies X
Pascal O. Rol; Karen Margaret Joos; Fabrice Manns, Editor(s)

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