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Proceedings Paper

Quantitative validation of a method for correction of intraoperative brain shift
Author(s): Lisa M. Bates; Stephan J. Goerss; Richard A. Robb
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Paper Abstract

Stereotactic neuronavigational systems have demonstrated significant clinical influence during the past decade, and are being used in an increasing number of neurosurgical procedures. Pre-operatively acquired 3D images are used for planning purposes, and also are employed in intraoperative navigations to help localize and resect brain lesions. However, as the operation progresses, multiple factors contribute the changes that limit the accuracy of the navigation based on pore-operative images alone. The opening of the dura with the associated loss of CSF and cortical swelling, the effect of gravity relative to the craniotomy location, tumor decompression, and collapse of neural tissue around the operative site are some of the factors that contribute to errors in navigation, particularly navigation based solely on pre-operatively acquired images. Neuronavigational system assume a one-to-one correlation between patient anatomy in the operating room and the pre- operatively acquired MRI images. Since the brain deforms in a non-linear manner, intraoperative brain shift can really only be corrected via intraoperative sensing methods that effectively update the pre-operatively acquired image data during surgery.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 May 2000
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 3911, Biomedical Diagnostic, Guidance, and Surgical-Assist Systems II, (3 May 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.384898
Show Author Affiliations
Lisa M. Bates, Mayo Clinic and Foundation (United States)
Stephan J. Goerss, Mayo Clinic and Foundation (United States)
Richard A. Robb, Mayo Clinic and Foundation (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3911:
Biomedical Diagnostic, Guidance, and Surgical-Assist Systems II
Tuan Vo-Dinh; Warren S. Grundfest; David A. Benaron, Editor(s)

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