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Proceedings Paper

Detection of phase transition of a biological membrane by precise refractive-index measurement based on low-coherence interferometry
Author(s): Masamitsu Haruna; Koji Yoden; Masato Ohmi; Akitoshi Seiyama
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Paper Abstract

Various functions of biological membranes are closely related to phase transition of phospholipid bilayers. However, there has been no possible method for in vivo measurement to detect the phase transition of biological membranes. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel method for detection of biological membranes using the low coherence interferometry. In the experiment, rat mesentery was used as the sample of biological membranes, and the refractive index of the mesentery was measured precisely as the sample temperature was changed. Abrupt change in both the index and transmission of the mesentery can be found in the temperature range of 38 percent C to 42 percent C, which is good agreement with the temperature range for the gel-to- liquid phase transition of the artificial membrane. Our method does not require any treatments, including fragmentation and centrifugation, for extraction of phospholipid bilayers form biological membranes. It, therefore, is a useful method for in vivo measurement and analysis of the membrane functions.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 April 2000
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 3915, Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedical Science and Clinical Applications IV, (28 April 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.384155
Show Author Affiliations
Masamitsu Haruna, School of Allied Health Sciences/Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Koji Yoden, School of Allied Health Sciences/Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Masato Ohmi, Achool of Allied Health Sciences/Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Akitoshi Seiyama, Graduate School of Medicine/Osaka Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3915:
Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedical Science and Clinical Applications IV
Valery V. Tuchin; Joseph A. Izatt; James G. Fujimoto, Editor(s)

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