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Proceedings Paper

GPR antenna position and orientation estimation using strapdown inertial navigation
Author(s): Friedrich Roth; Gary R. Olhoeft
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Paper Abstract

This paper discusses the possible use of strapdown inertial navigation for real-time ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna position and orientation estimation along arbitrary three-dimensional acquisition lines. Strapdown inertial navigation theory has been studied extensively in the literature for aircraft, missile and space navigation. Here, we give an overview of the theory as it applies to the antenna position and orientation problem. This includes the definition of the relevant coordinate frames and attitude parameters, a discussion of the measured acceleration and angular velocity, and a description of the four primary computational tasks pertinent to strapdown inertial navigation. These are the initial alignment of the system, the integration of angular velocity into attitude (attitude updating), the acceleration transformation and integration into velocity (velocity updating) and the integration of velocity into position (position updating). The key elements of using a low-grade versus a high-grade inertial measurement unit (IMU) are pointed out. The actual performance of a commercially available low-grade IMU is evaluated based on a series of navigation experiments. The experimental results show that the tested IMU is far from being accurate enough for completely self-contained antenna positioning and that the precise calibration for scale factors, biases and axis misalignments is vital. The observed orientation accuracy (error of less than 1 degree after 60 seconds) suggests the integration of the tested IMU with odometry, extending the applicability of the latter to environments with topography or where changing of the profile direction due to obstacles is necessary. Another possible use of low-grade IMUs might be for more sophisticated 'rubber sheeting' techniques.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 April 2000
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 4084, Eighth International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, (27 April 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.383486
Show Author Affiliations
Friedrich Roth, Colorado School of Mines (Netherlands)
Gary R. Olhoeft, Colorado School of Mines (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 4084:
Eighth International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar
David A. Noon; Glen F. Stickley; Dennis Longstaff, Editor(s)

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