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Proceedings Paper

CO2 laser damage trials on chemical vapor deposited diamond
Author(s): Charles S. James Pickles; Steven E. Coe; T. D. Madgwick; Ricardo S. Sussmann; Christopher J. H. Wort; Keith L. Lewis
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Paper Abstract

The resistance of Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond samples to high power, continuous wave CO2 lasers has been investigated. It was found that the major possibility of failure was through thermal hoop stresses at the disc edge and these formed as a result of a thermal runaway effect in the samples. CVD diamond's uniquely high thermal conductivity means that the thermal runaway can be prevented in almost all practical applications by effective cooling of the disc edge. If this is done, the laser damage threshold becomes so high that it is difficult to accurately quantify using standard laser systems. Other parameters which determine CVD diamond's performance in IR window applications, such as: modulation transfer function, samples flatness and absorption, have also been studied.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 March 2000
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 3902, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1999, (3 March 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.379323
Show Author Affiliations
Charles S. James Pickles, De Beers Industrial Diamond Div. (UK) Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Steven E. Coe, De Beers Industrial Diamond Div. (UK) Ltd. (United Kingdom)
T. D. Madgwick, De Beers Industrial Diamond Div. (UK) Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Ricardo S. Sussmann, De Beers Industrial Diamond Div. (UK) Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Christopher J. H. Wort, De Beers Industrial Diamond Div. (UK) Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Keith L. Lewis, Defence Evaluation and Research Agency Malvern (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3902:
Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1999
Gregory J. Exarhos; Arthur H. Guenther; Mark R. Kozlowski; Keith L. Lewis; M. J. Soileau, Editor(s)

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