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Proceedings Paper

Near-infrared diffuse tomography combined with a priori MRI structural information: testing a hybrid image reconstruction methodology with functional imaging of the rat cranium
Author(s): Brian W. Pogue; Troy O. McBride; Casmiar Nwaigwe; Ulf L. Oesterberg; Jeffrey F. Dunn; Keith D. Paulsen
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Paper Abstract

The ability to combine MRI and NIR information into a single imaging modality can potentially provide high-resolution images of absolute hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation from non-invasive simultaneous measurement. In order to take advantage of the MRI information, a finite element based imaging algorithm has been used to include both a priori structural information and spatial constraints during NIR image reconstruction. A case study of the optical changes in a rat cranium in response to variations in the inhaled oxygen supply has been used to test this imaging algorithm. The ability to introduce structure from MRI into NW image reconstruction resulted in significant improvements in the discrimination of hemoglobin concentration changes from oxygen saturation changes in the brain and muscle tissues.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 July 1999
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 3597, Optical Tomography and Spectroscopy of Tissue III, (15 July 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.356848
Show Author Affiliations
Brian W. Pogue, Dartmouth College (United States)
Troy O. McBride, Dartmouth College (United States)
Casmiar Nwaigwe, Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Ulf L. Oesterberg, Dartmouth College (United States)
Jeffrey F. Dunn, Dartmouth Medical School (United States)
Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3597:
Optical Tomography and Spectroscopy of Tissue III
Britton Chance; Robert R. Alfano; Bruce J. Tromberg, Editor(s)

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