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Proceedings Paper

Restoration of images from an airborne unstabilized hyperspectral line scanner
Author(s): Gregory J. Power; Thomas F. Rathbun; Steven W. Worrell
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Paper Abstract

An airborne hyperspectral line scanner is used to image the ground as the aircraft moves on a single trajectory. In reality, it may be difficult for the aircraft to maintain a perfectly steady course causing distortions in the imagery. So, special subsystems including stabilizers are used to maintain the hyperspectral line scanner on the proper course. If the subsystems of an airborne hyperspectral line scanner are malfunctioning or if the proper stabilizers are not available, then a technique is needed to restore the imagery. It no stabilizers are used on the airborne line scanner, but if aircraft navigation information is available including yaw, pitch and roll, then the restoration may be automated. However, if the stabilizers are malfunctioning or if the navigation information is corrupted or unavailable, then a technique is needed to restore the imagery. This paper introduces an automated technique for restoring hyperspectral images that was used on some images obtained for the Dynamic Data Base program sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The automated approach is based on image flow vectors obtained from the unstable image. The approach is introduced along with results that demonstrate how successful the restoration is at the feature level.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 July 1999
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 3717, Algorithms for Multispectral and Hyperspectral Imagery V, (16 July 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.353035
Show Author Affiliations
Gregory J. Power, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Thomas F. Rathbun, Air Force Research Lab. (United States)
Steven W. Worrell, Wright State Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3717:
Algorithms for Multispectral and Hyperspectral Imagery V
Sylvia S. Shen; Michael R. Descour, Editor(s)

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