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Proceedings Paper

Transaction recording in medical image processing
Author(s): Christian H. Riedel; Andreas Ploeger; Dietrich G. W. Onnasch; Hubertus M. Mehdorn
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Paper Abstract

In medical image processing original image data on archive servers may absolutely not be modified directly. On the other hand, images from read-only devices like CD-ROM cannot be changed and saved on the same storage medium. In both cases the modified data have to be stored as a second version and large amounts of storage volume are needed. We avoid these problems by using a program which records only each transaction prescribed to images. Each transaction is stored and used for further utilization and for renewed submission of the modified data. Conventionally, every time an image is viewed or printed, the modified version has to be saved in addition to the recorded data, either automatically or by the user. Compared to these approaches which not only squander storage space but area also time consuming our program has the following and advantages: First, the original image data which may not be modified are protected against manipulation. Second, small amounts of storage volume and network range are needed. Third, approved image operations can be automated by macros derived from transaction recordings. Finally, operations on the original data can always be controlled and traced back. As the handling of images gets easier with this concept, security for original image data is granted.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 July 1999
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 3662, Medical Imaging 1999: PACS Design and Evaluation: Engineering and Clinical Issues, (18 July 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.352735
Show Author Affiliations
Christian H. Riedel, Univ. of Kiel (United States)
Andreas Ploeger, Univ. of Kiel (Germany)
Dietrich G. W. Onnasch, Univ. of Kiel (Germany)
Hubertus M. Mehdorn, Univ. of Kiel (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3662:
Medical Imaging 1999: PACS Design and Evaluation: Engineering and Clinical Issues
G. James Blaine; Steven C. Horii, Editor(s)

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