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Proceedings Paper

Thermophysical properties of zirconium measured using electrostatic levitation
Author(s): Paul-Francois Paradis; Won-Kyu Rhim
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Paper Abstract

Six thermophysical properties of both the solid and liquid zirconium measured using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator at JPL are presented. These properties, are: density, thermal expansion coefficient, constant pressure heat capacity, hemispherical total emissivity, surface tension and viscosity. For the first time, we report the densities and the thermal expansion coefficients of both the solid as well as liquid Zr over wide ranges of temperatures. Over the 1700-2300 K temperature span, the liquid density can be expressed as ρl(T)=6.24 x 103 - 0.29 (T - Tm) kg/m3 with Tm=2128 K, and the corresponding volume expansion coefficient as αl = 4.6 x 10-5/K. Similarly, over the 1250-2100 K range, the measured density of the solid can be expressed as ρs(T)=6.34 x 103 - 0.15(T - Tm), giving a volume expansion coefficient αs = 2.35 x 10-5/K. The constant pressure heat capacity of the liquid phase could be estimated as Cpl(T) = 39.72 - 7.42 x 10-3(T - Tm) J/mol/K if the hemispherical total emissivity of the liquid phase εTl remains constant at 0.3 over the 1825 - 2200 K range. Over the 1400 - 2100 K temperature span, the hemispherical total emissivity of the solid phase could be rendered as εTs(T) = 0.29 - 9.91 x 103 (T - Tm). The measured surface tension and the viscosity of the molten zirconium over the 1850 - 2200 K range can be expressed as σ(T) = 1.459 x 103 - 0.244 (T - Tm) mN/m and as η(T) = 4.83 - 5.31 x 10-3(T - Tm) mPa.s, respectively.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 July 1999
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 3792, Materials Research in Low Gravity II, (6 July 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.351289
Show Author Affiliations
Paul-Francois Paradis, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
Won-Kyu Rhim, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3792:
Materials Research in Low Gravity II
Narayanan Ramachandran, Editor(s)

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