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Proceedings Paper

UV radiation at the fluorescence excitation maxima produces significant changes in the fluorescence of skin
Author(s): Nikiforos Kollias; W. D. Tian; George I. Zonios; Lorenzo Brancaleon; Robert Gillies
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Paper Abstract

Fluorescence excitation spectra of skin have been determined to be stable and reproducible. Three major bands dominate the wavelength range 280-400 nm. The major epidermal band due to tryptophan moieties appears at 295±5 nm and the major dermal bands due to collagen cross links appear at 335±5 nm and at 370±5 nm. The tryptophan fluorescence intensity has been found to increase with exposure to UV radiation; the UVB wavelengths are more effective than the UVA wavelengths. The PDCCL fluorescence intensity has been found to decrease dramatically with exposure to UVA in a wavelength specific way. The maximum of the action spectrum for this process is centered at the maximum of the excitation spectrum. The fluorescence of the skin recovers within 24 hours following exposure to UVA from single exposures. Multiple exposures produce permanent changes, in a follow-up of 8 weeks. the changes in the tryptophan fluorescence are probably due to changes in the molecular environment brought about by changes in the electrolyte balance in the epidermis following exposure. The changes in the dermis following UVA exposure appear to be associated with change in the collagen cross links, either through their association with other dermal species leading to quenching of the fluorescence or by the formation of stronger cross links with a smaller quantum efficiency. As these changes are immediate both alterations may provide the means for in vivo UV dosimetry.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 June 1999
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 3590, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems IX, (22 June 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.350994
Show Author Affiliations
Nikiforos Kollias, Wellman Labs. of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (United States)
W. D. Tian, Wellman Labs. of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (United States)
George I. Zonios, Wellman Labs. of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (United States)
Lorenzo Brancaleon, Wellman Labs. of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (United Kingdom)
Robert Gillies, Wellman Labs. of Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3590:
Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems IX
Kenton W. Gregory; R. Rox Anderson; David S. Robinson; Reza S. Malek; Lou Reinisch; Darryl J. Bornhop; Kenneth Eugene Bartels; Hans-Dieter Reidenbach; Lloyd P. Tate; C. Gaelyn Garrett; Eugene A. Trowers; Aaron P. Perlmutter; Kenneth Eugene Bartels; Lawrence S. Bass; Darryl J. Bornhop; C. Gaelyn Garrett; Kenton W. Gregory; Nikiforos Kollias; Harvey Lui; Reza S. Malek; Aaron P. Perlmutter; Hans-Dieter Reidenbach; Lou Reinisch; David S. Robinson; Lloyd P. Tate; Eugene A. Trowers, Editor(s)

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