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Proceedings Paper

Reduction of the effect of temperature in a fiber optic distributed sensor used for strain measurements in civil structures
Author(s): Hiroshige Ohno; Yasuomi Uchiyama; Toshio Kurashima
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Paper Abstract

We report on an approach for reducing the effects of temperature in a fiber optic distributed sensor. This technique employs a sensing fiber and a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR). The BOTDR has been proposed for measuring both strain and optical loss distribution along optical fibers by accessing only one end of the fiber. The BOTDR analyzes changes in the Brillouin frequency shift caused by strain. This device can measure distributed strain with an accuracy of better than plus or minus 60 X 10-6 and a high spatial resolution of up to 1 m over a 10 km long fiber. However, temperature fluctuations have an adverse effect on the accuracy with which the Brillouin frequency shift can be measured because the shift changes with temperature as well as with strain. This has meant that both spatial and temporal fluctuations in temperature must be compensated for when a fiber optic distributed sensor is used for continuous strain measurements in massive civil structures. We describe a method for the simultaneous determination of distributed strain and temperature which separates strain and temperature in a fiber optic sensor.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 May 1999
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 3670, Smart Structures and Materials 1999: Sensory Phenomena and Measurement Instrumentation for Smart Structures and Materials, (31 May 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.349763
Show Author Affiliations
Hiroshige Ohno, NTT Access Network Systems Labs. (Japan)
Yasuomi Uchiyama, NTT Access Network Systems Labs. (Japan)
Toshio Kurashima, NTT Access Network Systems Labs. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3670:
Smart Structures and Materials 1999: Sensory Phenomena and Measurement Instrumentation for Smart Structures and Materials
Richard O. Claus; William B. Spillman, Editor(s)

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