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Proceedings Paper

Developing a personal computer-based data visualization system using public domain software
Author(s): Philip C. Chen
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Paper Abstract

The current research will investigate the possibility of developing a computing-visualization system using a public domain software system built on a personal computer. Visualization Toolkit (VTK) is available on UNIX and PC platforms. VTK uses C++ to build an executable. It has abundant programming classes/objects that are contained in the system library. Users can also develop their own classes/objects in addition to those existing in the class library. Users can develop applications with any of the C++, Tcl/Tk, and JAVA environments. The present research will show how a data visualization system can be developed with VTK running on a personal computer. The topics will include: execution efficiency; visual object quality; availability of the user interface design; and exploring the feasibility of the VTK-based World Wide Web data visualization system. The present research will feature a case study showing how to use VTK to visualize meteorological data with techniques including, iso-surface, volume rendering, vector display, and composite analysis. The study also shows how the VTK outline, axes, and two-dimensional annotation text and title are enhancing the data presentation. The present research will also demonstrate how VTK works in an internet environment while accessing an executable with a JAVA application programing in a webpage.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 March 1999
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 3643, Visual Data Exploration and Analysis VI, (25 March 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.342821
Show Author Affiliations
Philip C. Chen, Future, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3643:
Visual Data Exploration and Analysis VI
Robert F. Erbacher; Philip C. Chen; Craig M. Wittenbrink, Editor(s)

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