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Proceedings Paper

Electronic state change of zirconium atoms by photochemical transformations at the surface of zircon (ZrSiO4) initiated by infrared laser radiation
Author(s): Anel F. Mukhammedgalieva; Anatolij M. Bondar; Victor T. Dubinchuk; Igor M. Swedov
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Paper Abstract

The photochemical transformations at the surface of single crystal zircon (ZrSiO4) induced by the action of continuous CO2 laser radiation (105 - 106 W/cm2) has been investigated. It has been found that the action of infrared laser radiation on the surface of zircon results in a selective sublimation of silicon oxides as well as in a change of electronic state of zirconium atoms included in the silicate matrix. The change of electronic state of zirconium atoms is confirmed by the change of the relation of K- and L-component intensity in X-ray emission spectra recorded by an X-ray microprobe analysis of irradiated samples. This change is connected with the decrease of a shielding of inside electrons and the delocalization of electron density into position of defects. The appearance of nonequilibrium electronic states of zirconium atoms is accompanied with the creation of the defect metallic clusters, in which the part of oxygen atoms is removed by laser sublimation of silicon-oxygen groups.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 February 1999
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 3732, ICONO '98: Laser Spectroscopy and Optical Diagnostics: Novel Trends and Applications in Laser Chemistry, Biophysics, and Biomedicine, (5 February 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.340026
Show Author Affiliations
Anel F. Mukhammedgalieva, Moscow State Mining Univ. (Russia)
Anatolij M. Bondar, Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science (Russia)
Victor T. Dubinchuk, Russian Institute of Raw Minerals (Russia)
Igor M. Swedov, Moscow State Mining Univ. (Russia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3732:
ICONO '98: Laser Spectroscopy and Optical Diagnostics: Novel Trends and Applications in Laser Chemistry, Biophysics, and Biomedicine

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