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Proceedings Paper

Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph detectors and ultraviolet signal-to-noise capabilities
Author(s): Mary Elizabeth Kaiser; Bruce E. Woodgate; Randy A. Kimble; Charles W. Bowers; Steven B. Kraemer; Vic S. Argabright; Phillip A. Driggers; Don J. Lindler; Ralph C. Bohlin; Charles N. Van Houten; Richard L. Bybee; Alan W. Delamere; David A. Dorn; Anthony C. Danks; Charles L. Joseph; J. Gethyn Timothy; Theodore R. Gull; Terrence L. Beck; Morley M. Blouke; Lawrence W. Brown; Mark D. Brumfield; Mark Clampin; David A. Content; Lee D. Feinberg; Walter B. Fowler; Paul Goudfrooij; Robert J. Hill; Richard Reed; Clive Standley; J. J. Yagelowich
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Paper Abstract

The space telescope imaging spectrograph (STIS) was designed as a versatile spectrograph capable of maintaining or exceeding the spectroscopic capabilities of both the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph and the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) over the broad bandpass extending from the UV through the visible. STIS achieves performance gains over the aforementioned first generation Hubble Space Telescope instruments primarily through the use of large a real detectors in both the UV and visible regions of the spectrum. Simultaneous spatial and spectral coverage is provided through long slit or slitless spectroscopy. This paper will review the detector design and in-flight performance. Attention will be focussed on the key issue of S/N performance. Spectra obtained during the first few months of operation, illustrate that high signal-to-noise spectra can be obtained while exploiting STIS's multiplexing advantage. From analysis of a single spectrum of GD153, with counting statistics of approximately 165, a S/N of approximately 130 is achieved per spectral resolution element in the FUV. In the NUV a single spectrum of GRW + 70D5824, with counting statistics of approximately 200, yields a S/N of approximately 150 per spectral resolution element. An even higher S/N capability is illustrated through the use of the fixed pattern split slits in the medium resolution echelle modes where observations of BD28D42 yield a signal-to-noise of approximately 250 and approximately 350 per spectral resolution element in the FUV and NUV respectively.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 August 1998
PDF: 17 pages
Proc. SPIE 3356, Space Telescopes and Instruments V, (28 August 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.324542
Show Author Affiliations
Mary Elizabeth Kaiser, STIS Investigation Definition Team, Johns Hopkins Univ., and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr (United States)
Bruce E. Woodgate, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Randy A. Kimble, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Charles W. Bowers, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Steven B. Kraemer, STIS Investigation Definition Team and Catholic Univ. of America (United States)
Vic S. Argabright, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Phillip A. Driggers, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Don J. Lindler, Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc. (United States)
Ralph C. Bohlin, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Charles N. Van Houten, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Richard L. Bybee, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Alan W. Delamere, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
David A. Dorn, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Anthony C. Danks, STIS Investigation Definition Team and Raytheon STX Corp. (United States)
Charles L. Joseph, STIS Investigation Definition Team and Rutgers Univ. (United States)
J. Gethyn Timothy, STIS Investigation Definition Team and Pegasus Glassworks, Inc. (United States)
Theodore R. Gull, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Terrence L. Beck, Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc. (United States)
Morley M. Blouke, Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Lawrence W. Brown, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Mark D. Brumfield, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Mark Clampin, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
David A. Content, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Lee D. Feinberg, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Walter B. Fowler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Paul Goudfrooij, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Robert J. Hill, Raytheon STX Corp. (United States)
Richard Reed, National Optical Astronomy Observatories (United States)
Clive Standley, Raytheon STX Corp., NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr., and Adaptive Optics Associates (United States)
J. J. Yagelowich, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3356:
Space Telescopes and Instruments V
Pierre Y. Bely; James B. Breckinridge, Editor(s)

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