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Proceedings Paper

On-orbit optical performance of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph
Author(s): Charles W. Bowers; Bruce E. Woodgate; Randy A. Kimble; M. E. Kaiser; Theodore R. Gull; Steven B. Kraemer; George F. Hartig; David A. Content; Dennis Charles Ebbets; David Michika; Joseph F. Sullivan; Robert A. Woodruff; M. Bottema; Don J. Lindler; P. C. Plait; Clive Standley; Nicholas R. Collins; R. H. Cornett; Wayne Landsman; Eliot M. Malumuth; R. D. Robinson
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Paper Abstract

The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) operates from the UV to near IR providing a general purpose, imaging spectroscopic capability. An internal, two mirror relay system corrects the spherical aberration and astigmatism present at the STIS field position. Low and medium resolution imaging spectroscopy is possible throughout the spectral range and over the 25 arcsecond UV and 52 arcsecond visible fields. High resolution echelle spectroscopy capability is also provided in the UV. Target acquisition is accomplished using the STIS cameras, either UV or visible; these cameras may also be used to provide broad band imaging over the complete spectral range or with the small selection of available bandpass filters. A wide selection of slits and apertures permit various combinations of spectral resolution and field size in all modes. On board calibration lamps provide wavelength calibration and flat fielding capability. We report here on the optical performance of STIS as determined during orbital verification.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 August 1998
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 3356, Space Telescopes and Instruments V, (28 August 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.324541
Show Author Affiliations
Charles W. Bowers, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Bruce E. Woodgate, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Randy A. Kimble, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
M. E. Kaiser, STIS Investigation Definition Team, Johns Hopkins Univ., and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr (United States)
Theodore R. Gull, STIS Investigation Definition Team and NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Steven B. Kraemer, STIS Investigation Definition Team and Catholic Univ. of America (United States)
George F. Hartig, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
David A. Content, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Dennis Charles Ebbets, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
David Michika, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Joseph F. Sullivan, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Robert A. Woodruff, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
M. Bottema, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Don J. Lindler, Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc. (United States)
P. C. Plait, Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc. (United States)
Clive Standley, Adaptive Optics Associates (United States)
Nicholas R. Collins, Raytheon STX Corp. (United States)
R. H. Cornett, Raytheon STX Corp. (United States)
Wayne Landsman, Raytheon STX Corp. (United States)
Eliot M. Malumuth, Raytheon STX Corp. (United States)
R. D. Robinson, Catholic Univ. of America (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3356:
Space Telescopes and Instruments V
Pierre Y. Bely; James B. Breckinridge, Editor(s)

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