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Proceedings Paper

Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components
Author(s): Peter M. Martin; Dean W. Matson; Wendy D. Bennett; D. J. Hammerstrom
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Paper Abstract

Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (≥50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 September 1998
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 3515, Microfluidic Devices and Systems, (10 September 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.322079
Show Author Affiliations
Peter M. Martin, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Dean W. Matson, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Wendy D. Bennett, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
D. J. Hammerstrom, Mesosystems Technology, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3515:
Microfluidic Devices and Systems
A. Bruno Frazier; Chong Hyuk Ahn, Editor(s)

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