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Proceedings Paper

MACHO data pipeline
Author(s): Timothy S. Axelrod; R. A. Allsman; Peter J. Quinn; Charles R. Alcock; D. Alves; A. Becker; D. P. Bennett; Kenneth H. Cook; A. Drake; K. C. Freeman; Kim Griest; M. Lehner; Stuart L. Marshall; D. Minniti; Bruce A. Peterson; Mark R. Pratt; Alex W. Rodgers; Christopher W. Stubbs; W. J. Sutherland; Austin Tomaney; T. Vandehei; D. Welch
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Paper Abstract

The MACHO experiment is searching for dark matter in the halo of the Galaxy by monitoring more than 50 million stars in the LMC, SMC, and Galactic bulge for gravitational microlensing events. The hardware consists of a 50 inch telescope, a two-color 32 megapixel ccd camera and a network of computers. On clear nights the system generates up to 8 GB of raw data and 1 GB of reduced data. The computer system is responsible for all realtime control tasks, for data reduction, and for storing all data associated with each observation in a database. The subject of this paper is the software system that handles these functions. It is an integrated system controlled by Petri nets that consists of multiple processes communicating via mailboxes and a bulletin board. The system is highly automated, readily extensive, and incorporates flexible error recovery capabilities. It is implemented with C++ in a Unix environment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 July 1998
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 3349, Observatory Operations to Optimize Scientific Return, (3 July 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.316482
Show Author Affiliations
Timothy S. Axelrod, Mt. Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory (United States)
R. A. Allsman, Australian National Univ. (Australia)
Peter J. Quinn, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Charles R. Alcock, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
D. Alves, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
A. Becker, Univ. of Washington (United States)
D. P. Bennett, McMaster Univ. (Canada)
Kenneth H. Cook, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
A. Drake, Mt. Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory (Australia)
K. C. Freeman, Mt. Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory (Australia)
Kim Griest, Univ. of California/San Diego (United States)
M. Lehner, Univ. of California/San Diego (United States)
Stuart L. Marshall, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
D. Minniti, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (Chile)
Bruce A. Peterson, Mt. Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory (Australia)
Mark R. Pratt, Univ. of Washington (United States)
Alex W. Rodgers, Mt. Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatory (Australia)
Christopher W. Stubbs, Univ. of Washington (United States)
W. J. Sutherland, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)
Austin Tomaney, Univ. of Washington (United States)
T. Vandehei, Univ. of California/San Diego (United States)
D. Welch, McMaster Univ. (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3349:
Observatory Operations to Optimize Scientific Return
Peter J. Quinn, Editor(s)

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