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Proceedings Paper

Laser micromachining of chemically altered polymers
Author(s): Thomas K. Lippert
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Paper Abstract

During the last decade laser processing of polymers has become an important field of applied and fundamental research. One of the most promising proposal, to use laser ablation as dry etching technique in photolithography, has not yet become an industrial application. Many disadvantages of laser ablation, compared to conventional photolithography, are the result of the use of standard polymers. These polymers are designed for totally different applications, but are compared to the highly specialized photoresist. A new approach to laser polymer ablation will be described; the development of polymers, specially designed for high resolution laser ablation. These polymers have photolabile groups in the polymer backbone, which decompose upon laser irradiation or standard polymers are modified for ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength. The absorption maximum can be tailored for specific laser emission lines, e.g. 351, 308 and 248 nm lines of excimer lasers. We will show that with this approach many problems associated with the application of laser ablation for photolithography can be solved. The mechanism of ablation for these photopolymers is photochemical, whereas for most of the standard polymers this mechanism is photothermal. The photochemical decomposition mechanism results in high resolution ablation with no thermal damage at the edges of the etched structures. In addition there are not redeposited ablation products or surface modifications of the polymer after ablation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 June 1998
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 3274, Laser Applications in Microelectronic and Optoelectronic Manufacturing III, (3 June 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.309513
Show Author Affiliations
Thomas K. Lippert, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3274:
Laser Applications in Microelectronic and Optoelectronic Manufacturing III
Jan J. Dubowski; Peter E. Dyer, Editor(s)

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