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Proceedings Paper

Optical motherboard: a planar chip-to-chip interconnection scheme for dense optical wiring
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Paper Abstract

Inthe field of optical interconnection research, the topic perhaps closest to widespread applications is the realization of optical board to board and chip to chip interconnections [1]. The inherent limitations of electronic interconnects regarding bandwidth and electromagnetic interference are overcome by waveguide, fiber, or free space optics. With free space optics additionally the high interconnect density ofoptical imaging can be employed. One ofthe basic problems is the addressing of emitted signals to the intended detector. The concept of folding a free-space optical system into a thick transparent planeparallel substrate, was proposed by Jahns and Huang in 1989 [2]. Planar optics, also known as substrate-mode optics, fully employs the three dimensional nature of light propagation and also the fabrication methods known from integrated circuit manufacturing can be adopted. In addition to that the advantage ofthese technologies are compact packaging and simple alignment ofthe optical and electronical elements. The problem involved in folding optical light paths for imaging of extended data fields is the demand for good off-axis imaging properties ofthe optical elements. Besides diffractive solutions i.e. DOEs or CGHs [3] refractive optics offers the possibility for wavelength multiplexing since the wavelength dependence is only due to material dispersion. For off axis imaging in a folded zig-zag-path the optical system also has to be corrected by special astigmatic components.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 May 1998
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 3490, Optics in Computing '98, (22 May 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.308885
Show Author Affiliations
Jochen Baehr, Univ. Mannheim (Germany)
Karl-Heinz Brenner, Univ. Mannheim (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3490:
Optics in Computing '98

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