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Proceedings Paper

DLC thin film growth under energetic particle bombardment: a comparison between PLD and rf-bias enhanced PLD
Author(s): Thomas Klotzbuecher; Jens Gottmann; M. Meyer; David A. Wesner; Ernst-Wolfgang Kreutz
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Paper Abstract

Pulsed laser deposition with KrF-excimer laser radiation ((lambda) equals 248 nm, (tau) equals 25 ns) is used to grow thin films of diamond-like carbon (DLC) on Si substrates by material removal from a graphite target in vacuum (10-5 - 10-4 mbar) or in processing gas atmospheres (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, p approximately equals 10-2 mbar). Additional ion bombardment is performed by extracting inert gas ions from a low pressure rf gas discharge which is ignited in the deposition chamber. Raman spectroscopy reveals that the sp3-content of the DLC films depends on the fluence of the laser radiation on the target, the substrate temperature and processing gas pressure. Especially the applied laser fluence and the inert gas pressure strongly influence the energy of the film-forming particles and therefore the relative amounts of sp2 and sp3 bonds in the films. Using additional ion bombardment from the low pressure gas discharge leads to more nanoclustered films in the case of higher ion masses due to a more effective defect creation. However, the films are predominantly sp2-bonded, caused by substrate heating due to dissipation of electric energy at the substrate electrode.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 May 1998
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 3404, ALT'97 International Conference on Laser Surface Processing, (26 May 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.308599
Show Author Affiliations
Thomas Klotzbuecher, Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany)
Jens Gottmann, Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany)
M. Meyer, Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany)
David A. Wesner, Fraunhofer Institut fuer Lasertechnik (Germany)
Ernst-Wolfgang Kreutz, Technische Univ. Aachen (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3404:
ALT'97 International Conference on Laser Surface Processing

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