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Proceedings Paper

Efficient system for wavenumber-frequency analysis of underwater structures
Author(s): Walter H. Boober; David Morton; Charles Gedney; Philip Abbot
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Paper Abstract

A watertight housing was developed to a low a scanning laser vibrometer (SLV) system to work underwater. Compared to other underwater optical measurement systems, this system offers distinct advantages, including ease of adaptation to a variety of teste, no requirement to be near tank windows, and a simplified rigging system. The system was recently sued to successfully conduct a wavenumber frequency evaluation of the vibratory response of a submerged cylindrical shell. The technical issues in developing the housing and assuring the integrity of the SLV accuracy during transition to underwater use will be discussed. Also, problems encountered in maximizing return signal strength, preparation of the shell, and the process of on-sight data transfer for quick-look wavenumber-frequency analysis while data are being acquired will be presented. The cylindrical shell was excited with 100 to 5000 Hz chirp signals by a 44 N shaker that was attached axially at the center of a bulkhead. A scan consisted of 3 columns with 64 measurement points per column. The shell was rotated 11.25 degrees and the scan repeated to collect an array of 32 by 64 equally spaced points totalling 6144 measurements. The time of data acquisition was about 11 hours. This underwater housing permitted the type of measurements that are not readily available with other systems. With most other techniques the collection time would have been significantly longer. The transfer functions between the velocities measured at each scan location and the shaker force signal were computed as functions of frequency. The transfer functions computed for the center scan columns were then transformed into the wavevector domain using a 2D FFT program. Preliminary results show that the shell response is concentrated near zero circumferential wavenumber, due to the axial symmetry of the driving force. Further, the maximum shell response is also concentrated near the ring frequency of the cylinder, at an axial wavenumber of about -20 rad/m.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 June 1998
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 3411, Third International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications, (1 June 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.307711
Show Author Affiliations
Walter H. Boober, Naval Undersea Warfare Ctr. (United States)
David Morton, Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems Inc. (United States)
Charles Gedney, Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems Inc. (United States)
Philip Abbot, Ocean Acoustical Services and Instrumentation Systems Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3411:
Third International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications

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