Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

High-sensitivity determination of Zn(II) and Cu(II) in vitro by fluorescence polarization
Author(s): Richard B. Thompson; Badri P. Maliwal; Vincent Feliccia; Carol A. Fierke
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Recent work has suggested that free Cu(II) may play a role in syndromes such as Crohn's and Wilson's diseases, as well as being a pollutant toxic at low levels to shellfish and sheep. Similarly, Zn(II) has been implicated in some neural damage in the brain resulting from epilepsy and ischemia. Several high sensitivity methods exist for determining these ions in solution, including GFAAS, ICP-MS, ICP-ES, and electrochemical techniques. However, these techniques are generally slow and costly, require pretreatment of the sample, require complex instruments and skilled personnel, and are incapable of imaging at the cellular and subcellular level. To address these shortcomings we developed fluorescence polarization (anisotropy) biosensing methods for these ions which are very sensitivity, highly selective, require simple instrumentation and little pretreatment, and are inexpensive. Thus free Cu(II) or Zn(II) can be determined at picomolar levels by changes in fluorescence polarization, lifetime, or wavelength ratio using these methods; these techniques may be adapted to microscopy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 April 1998
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 3259, Systems and Technologies for Clinical Diagnostics and Drug Discovery, (10 April 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.307337
Show Author Affiliations
Richard B. Thompson, Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine/Baltimore (United States)
Badri P. Maliwal, Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine/Baltimore (United States)
Vincent Feliccia, Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine/Baltimore (United States)
Carol A. Fierke, Duke Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3259:
Systems and Technologies for Clinical Diagnostics and Drug Discovery
Gerald E. Cohn; John C. Owicki, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top