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Proceedings Paper

Compensation of 3D image perspective distortion using a sliding-aperture multistereoscopic technique
Author(s): Serguei A. Shestak; Jung-Young Son; Jea-Soon Kim
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Paper Abstract

Magnified real image of 3D object, provided by conventional optical means is more stretched in depth by the factor of lateral magnification. We found, that our recently reported sliding aperture multistereoscopic technique, utilizing sequential views projection on the scanning mirror, is capable of producing equally magnified 3D images. This capability is based on image depth control that can be used for compensation of perspective distortion, caused by the optical magnification. Image formation analysis shows that relative visual position of a certain image point in depth can be exactly corrected in order to get the same scaling in both depth and lateral direction. Longitudinal position of other points of image will also be corrected, but with some error, depending on their lateral and longitudinal positions. This error results from the difference between the nonlinear components of perspective distortion and compensation mechanism. Error magnitude is usually small enough for the image to look equally magnified.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 April 1998
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 3295, Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems V, (30 April 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.307156
Show Author Affiliations
Serguei A. Shestak, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (Russia)
Jung-Young Son, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (South Korea)
Jea-Soon Kim, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (South Korea)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3295:
Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems V
Mark T. Bolas; Mark T. Bolas; Scott S. Fisher; Scott S. Fisher; John O. Merritt, Editor(s)

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